Since the middle of the last century, we have experienced a period of strong economic growth, a lot of which was based on research and innovation. Crises including global heating, environment and loss of biodiversity have led us to question the value of unconstrained growth. Scientific and technological optimism is waning, and there is growing distrust of scientist and experts in some quarters. The response at the political level has been to refocus some research and innovation funding on the ‘societal challenges’ and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This can involve trying to change complex ‘socio-technical systems’, such as the entire electricity production and distribution system, new ‘missions’ policies and other large, complex innovation programmes. 

As a result, the governance of research and innovation is entering into a new era, with complex innovation and transition programmes. These programmes are often large and long-lasting and require involvement across many parts of government and with different stakeholders, many of whom have traditionally not been part of research and innovation policy.

The new programmes drive new needs and demands, such as:

Technopolis Group has been at the heart of changes in innovation for more than 30 years.  We support policymakers and research and innovation organisations in addressing the challenges they face by delivering strategic advice, strategic studies, foresight and evaluations notably on:

Technopolis Group has been at the heart of changes in innovation for more than 30 years.  We support policymakers and research and innovation organisations in addressing the challenges they face by delivering strategic advice, strategic studies, foresight and evaluations notably on:

We especially have an in-depth knowledge of technologies and markets in:

We operate all over Europe and beyond, particularly in low and middle-income countries.